Reaction to non taken action!

Since 71%  of oil goes to transportation—transporting ourselves and the goods and foods we purchase, there’s no question that a radical reduction in driving and travel are required to effectively reduce oil dependence.  The greatest gains will come fromreducing our own driving and flying as well as the transportation of the goods that we purchase.

1. Change your vehicle use patterns.  Use your car a lot less or not at all.  Walk, bike, use public transportation. If it’s necessary to use a car, be sure to have a fuel-efficient vehicle or car pool.  Aggregate your trips, so there’s one weekly shopping trip, for example, instead of 4 or 5.  Reconsider and reduce travel by air.

2. Buy products that are produced locally, instead of one’s that require transportation from a distance.  In the same vein, buy vegetables and fruits in season instead of one’s that are imported from another country.

3. Buy used products instead of new ones, which will reduce oil use both in production and transportation.  Craig’s list, garage sales, and classified ads are good resources for used items.  Often, you can find items that are almost brand new.

4. Reduce the use of plastic, a petroleum derived product.  Reusable shopping bags are a great first step, but we can all probably do much more to reduce plastic consumption.  To stimulate your thinking, Beth at Fake Plastic Fish gives you 60 different ways you could decline plastic in your life.  If you gradually work your way through the list over the next 1-2 years, you will make a huge dent in your plastic purchases.  As Beth points out, sadly, “Our oceans are filling up with plastic: plastic that harms wildlife and never biodegrades; plastic that enters the food chain and leaches toxic chemicals.”   I’ve reduced my use of plastic considerably but, looking at Beth’s list, I see there’s much more that I could do.  How about you?

5. Buy natural fiber clothing instead of polyester, nylon, and other forms of synthetic, petroleum derived clothing.  Natural fibers include cotton, hemp, silk, linen, rayon, wool, ramie, and tencel.  Naturally, organic is a better choice, since pesticides are unhealthy and may also contain chemicals sourced from petroleum, although it’s not an affordable option for everyone.  It has also been pointed out that silk and wool are not necessarily the best options since their manufacturing process involves cruelty to animals.

6. Discontinue the use of perfume and scented products. 95% of the chemicals in most perfume are derived from petrochemicals.  Likewise, avoid products that contain synthetic fragrance and scents like personal care products (deodorants, lotions, hair spray, etc.), laundry detergent, dryer sheets, candles, air fresheners, scented cleaning products, and so on.  In addition to reducing your petroleum consumption, fragrance-free living reduces the health risks associated with the use of fragrance.  It is also an act of compassion, helping to create safer environments for people with allergies, asthma, and chemical sensitivity, who are triggered by the chemicals contained in fragrance.

7. Use soy based inks instead of the standard petroleum-based ones.

8. Forgo wall-to-wall carpeting, which is typically loaded with synthetic fibers, not to mention the backing.

9. Regular crayons are a petroleum derived product.  Beeswax crayons have been suggested as an alternative, but it’s been pointed out by vegans that these are an animal derived product.  Any suggestions?

10. Use alternatives to petroleum-based building and remodeling materials.

11. Turn down the heat.

Now really health concerns are for real!

The Michigan PCC was authorized as a legal agent of the state to receive the reports from health care providers for the purposes of this investigation. Information for details listed below has been taken from respectful owners Michigan website.

This allowed for 24/7 reporting, and allowed for PCC medical toxicologists to provide consultation to health care providers regarding oil spill-related patient diagnosis or treatment. Patient information collected included name, contact information and demographics, medical encounter date, clinical effects, laboratory test results, diagnosis, treatment, and contact information for the reporting provider.

On Monday July 26, 2010, Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P., reported the burst of a 30-inch pipeline near Marshall, Michigan, in Calhoun County. In response to concerns about acute health effects from exposure to spilled oil in this major disaster, state and local public health in Michigan quickly set up a multi-faceted public health surveillance system that included health care provider reporting, community surveys, calls from the public to the Poison Control Center, and analysis of data submitted to the state’s syndromic surveillance system. The surveillance system received 147 health care provider reports on 145 patients, identified 320 (58%) of 550 individuals with adverse health effects from four community surveys along the impacted waterways, identified one small worksite symptomatic employees, and tracked 41 calls that were placed to the poison center by the public. Headache, nausea, and respiratory symptoms were the predominant symptoms reported by exposed individuals in all reporting systems. These symptoms are consistent with the published literature regarding potential health effects associated with acute exposure to crude oil. One of the major health which is headache might be even relieved by usage of pain gone pen that we are not in any way related with.

MDCH and the impacted local health departments quickly established a multicomponent public health surveillance system to assess and measure the health impacts associated with exposure to crude oil, its vapors, and/or its odors resulting from the Enbridge pipeline spill in July 2010. The surveillance system received 147 health care provider reports on 145 patients; identified 320 (58%) of 550 individuals with adverse health effects from four community surveys along the impacted waterways, and tracked forty-one calls that were placed to the poison center by the public. Headache, nausea, and respiratory symptoms were the predominant symptoms reported by exposed individuals in all reporting systems. These symptoms are consistent with the published literature and the Enbridge Material Safety Data Sheet regarding potential health effects associated with acute exposure to crude oil.5,6 A number of epidemiologic studies performed in the weeks or months following major oil spills have reported similar types of symptoms to those identified in our community surveys. Studies of acute health effects from an oil spill in Shetland, Scotland and Wales documented significant differences in similar sets of self-reported symptoms between exposed residents and control groups.7,8 The post-spill prevalence of headache in the exposed for these two studies was similar to our that in our community surveys (Shetland: 32%; Wales: 38%; Enbridge communities: 34.5%) but higher in their control groups than our Comparison group (Shetland: 8%; Wales: 14.1%; Enbridge: 0.7%). This pattern was similar for other symptoms. In a study of a spill near Karachi Pakistan, the frequency of one or more symptoms was markedly higher in both the exposed and the control groups (96% in exposed and 70% in controls) than in our populations.9 In a comprehensive review of all studies regarding the impact of oil exposure on human health, Aguilera et al. concluded that most studies “…provide evidence on the relationship between exposure and the appearance of acute physical, psychological, genotoxic and endocrine effects in the exposed individuals.”10 17 Symptom prevalence as determined by our community surveys was significantly greater overall in the exposed communities than in the comparison community upstream from the spill. At the same time, there were some differences between the four communities regarding symptom prevalence. These differences may be associated with differences in geographical proximity to the river or health risk factors, including prevalence of chronic health conditions and smoking, both of which are inversely associated with socio-economic status. Symptom prevalence was lowest in the community (the Subdivision) with the lowest smoking and chronic disease prevalence, and the highest home values; and it was highest in the “Neighborhood”, which had the highest chronic disease prevalence as well as the lowest home values.

Our goal was to speak and say how important this is!

In case you have any doubts about the degree to which petroleum has entered every nook and cranny of your life, take a look at the following list  of “things that get their start from oil and natural gas.”  This list is from the 2 page pamphlet called “There’s a lot of life in oil and natural gas,” which you can download as a PDF file from the American Petroleum Institute’s website.

  • “Aircraft
  • Antihistamines
  • Antiseptics
  • Aspirin
  • Baloons
  • Bandages
  • Blenders
  • Cameras
  • Candies
  • Carpet
  • CD’s
  • Cellphones
  • Clothing
  • Computers
  • Containers
  • Crayons
  • Dentures
  • Deodorant
  • Diapers
  • Digital Clocks
  • Dinnerware
  • DVD’s
  • Dyes
  • Eyeglasses
  • Frames
  • Fertilizers
  • Food Preservatives
  • Food
  • Storage Bags
  • Footballs
  • Foul Weather Gear
  • Furniture
  • Garbage Bags
  • Glue
  • Golf Balls
  • Hair Dryers
  • Hang Gliders
  • Heart Valve Replacements
  • House Paint
  • Infant Seats
  • Ink
  • Insecticides
  • Life Jackets
  • Lipstick
  • Luggage
  • Medical Equipment
  • Nylon Rope
  • Pacemakers
  • Pantyhose
  • Patio Screens
  • Perfumes
  • Photographic Film
  • Photographs
  • Piano Keys
  • Roller Blades
  • Roofing
  • Safety Glass
  • Shampoo
  • Shaving Cream
  • Shower Curtains
  • Slippers
  • Soft Contact Lenses
  • Strollers
  • Sunglasses
  • Surfboards
  • Surgical Equipment
  • Syringes
  • Telephones
  • Tents
  • TENS devices
  • Toothpaste
  • Toys
  • Umbrellas
  • Vitamin Capsules
  • and a whole lot more.”

The very nature of life is interdependence.  Any step you take—large or small—toward reducing your personal consumption of oil is a positive step for the people of Equatorial Guinea and for the entire world.  It will also help to avert future oil spills. This information has been taken from always well within website and all rights belong to them.